Tag Archives: malay

Is race-based politics still relevant?


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Is race-based politics still relevant?
By Zan Azlee

I do not agree with race-based politics. There are many examples that actually show how detrimental it is to national harmony in Malaysia.

Recently, I had the opportunity to have a sit-down interview Khairy Jamaluddin, the Minister of Youth and Sports, and he shared with me some of his views.

As we know, he is also the Youth Chief of Umno, a political party that serves to protect the interests of the Malay community in the country.

Khairy says that there is nothing wrong fo r a community to want to protect their interest as long as it doesn’t override the interest of national harmony.

“Politics based on ethnicity that pits one race against another, or the politics of hate and fear, is something that is not on,” he says.

He adds that it is totally fine for groups to protect the rights of different religious communities such as the Muslims, Hindus, Christians, and whatnot.

Khairy is also against extremist voices and hate-speech. He believes that there should be clearer legislation to eliminate this from continuing

In theory, I do agree with what he says. However, my point of contention is that there has been too many incidents that just shows the negative side of race-based politics.

I have the opinion that it is through decades of race-based politics that we see how segregated Malaysia is at the current moment. [Click to read the full article at English.AstroAwani.Com]

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Palestine will go back to just being a car sticker


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Palestine will go back to just being a car sticker
By Zan Azlee

Last week, I wrote in my column here that I am not one of those who are boycotting McDonald’s or Starbucks Coffee.

The reason I am not boycotting them is because I feel that the problem lies much deeper than just fast food companies and designer coffee.

I wrote that the backers of the Israel government had too much clout that a mere boycott of a few companies will not do any damage. Instead, locals get hurt more.

I also wrote that for something to actually hurt the Israel government, it has to be big and prominent enough.

For example, how several European state-owned investment arms have blacklisted Israeli companies and financial institutions.

I also said that governments that trade with Israel by proxy because they didn’t want to be seen as ‘trading with Israel’ should also cease what they are doing.

Read my column last week carefully. I also didn’t belittle the thousands who have decided to boycott McDonald’s and what not.

How can you blame them? Without the right facts and information, they actually believe what they are doing is right.

But when the boycott turns out to be just plain vandalism and bullying, then how do you justify it as being right?

Outlets being damaged, workers being attacked an assaulted, their children being shunned in school. How does that help the Palestinians?

The response that came in regarding my column last week were amusing to say the least, although a few agreed with what I had to say, many condemned me.

They accused me of being a Jew, an infidel, a hater of Muslims, an associate of the devil and a lot more colourful words and phrases.

That’s fine by me. I’m a big boy and I can definitely take criticism. Anyway, a little bit of name-calling just makes things a little bit more interesting.

But here’s the thing. I wonder what these people who are condemning me so strongly are thinking about the statement made by the Palestinian ambassador to Malaysia?

Dr. Anwar Al Agha yesterday said that it would be much better if people actually pressured and lobbied against the Unites States rather than boycott McDonald’s. [Click to read the full article at English.AstroAwani.Com]

The Fat Bidin Vox Pop (Ep 5) – Ibrahim Ali goes international! What do Malaysians think of dogs?


Ibrahim Ali recently graduated from local media to international news… claiming that the use of cute and adorable Scottish Terrier dogs during the opening ceremony of the Commonwealth Games was disrespectful to Islam. We spend an evening by the lake at Kota Kemuning, Shah Alam, to find out people’s perception of Islam’s view on dogs.

Check out the accompanying podcast:

For more episodes of The Fat Bidin Vox Pop: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1d-NZ0GhtntbufmCVanQ17tj7MT9y0e9

Subscribe to Fat Bidin on YouTube http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=zanazlee

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The Fat Bidin Podcast (Ep 12) – Ibrahim Ali goes international! How are Malay-Muslims perceived now?


Ibrahim Ali is always using the media to make his racist remarks heard. Recently, he has even started using the international media… claiming that the use of cute and adorable Scottish Terrier dogs during the opening ceremony of the Commonwealth Games was disrespectful to Islam.

*Watch The Fat Bidin Vox Pop video where Zan and Aizyl take to the mean streets of Malaysia to find out the people’s view on the topic!

Listen to more podcasts at http://www.soundcloud.com/fatbidin

 

What if I was a Muslim convert?


An old Jewish scripture in Kabul's only synagogue.

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What if I was a Muslim convert?
By Zan Azlee

A lot of people say that to be born a Muslim is something wonderful and lucky. I was born a Muslim but sometimes, I don’t feel so lucky about it.

It’s not that I felt unlucky to be a Muslim. I just wondered how it felt for someone who was a not a Muslim deciding to embrace Islam as a religion.

My experience as a born Muslim in Malaysia is a little bit different than what I imagined a Muslim convert would experience and that’s why I wonder.

In my mind, for someone who is not a Muslim wanting to be a Muslim, he or she must have had a huge epiphany to be convinced into converting. And that must be a wonderful feeling.

I, on the other hand, grew up learning about Islam. I went to religious classes when I was a young kid when I didn’t understand the significance of it.

What I learned were the habits and rituals of the religion. I mean, what else can you teach a kid who had not reached mental and physical maturity yet.

As I grew older, the rituals and habits became more intense as the teachers who taught me began to scare me into practicing them, convincing me that if I strayed, I would be punished.

It was only when I got older, and began looking for another meaning to Islam and being a Muslim that I have come to appreciate the religion and to understand it’s beauty.

So, back to these converts. [Click to read the full article at The Malaysian Insider]