Tag Archives: malay

Which mazhab is the best? Ours?


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Which mazhab is the best? Ours?
By Zan Azlee

I went for Friday prayers at the main mosque in Bamiyan, a city and province in the mountains of northern Afghanistan. They are mainly from the Hanafi school of jurisprudence, as opposed to the Shafi’i here in Malaysia.

The way the prayers were conducted were slightly different in the arrangements of the sermon and optional prayers which I wasn’t used too. And neither did I understand the sermon.

But it was no big deal. The Hanafi school is one of the four main Sunni schools, or mazhabs, and it’s aqidah (creed) is the same. The only difference is the interpretation of fiqh (jurisprudence) and rituals.

So it is no problem for a Shafi’ifollower like me (being from Malaysia) to pray alongside those from the other mazhabs. Through my travels around the world, I have prayed alongside all of them.
Now back to northern Afghanistan on that Friday afternoon about three years ago. After Friday prayers concluded, I managed to catch up with the Afghan Imam who had led it. He was young and very handsome.

I told him where I came from and told him why I was in his country (I was shooting a documentary). We chatted for a while when he brought up the subject of the different mazhabs between our regions.

“Shafi’i mazhab has beautiful teachings. I admire the strong faith that the Malaysian Muslims have. They are known around the world to be very devout in their faith,” he smiled.

I mentioned to him that I noticed the differences in how they conducted Friday prayers the Hanafi way and I was unfamiliar, so I mainly just followed the crowd in the mosque.

“That’s okay. We are all Muslim and we share the same faith. Our structure may be different but our hearts and intentions are the same. We are brothers,” he said in response.

Being the humorist and comedian that I am (and usually in the most inappropriate times!), I mentioned to him that he is the most good-looking imam I had ever met! He laughed and we hugged goodbye. [Click to read the full article at The Malaysian Insider]

 

 

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Are Muslims smart enough to think?


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Are Muslims smart enough to think?
By Zan Azlee

It is sad when the system has caused the indoctrination of a people to a point where all thinking and rationalisation seems to have been eliminated and destroyed.

As humankind develops, all kinds of fields of study progresses along with it, from the arts and philosophy, to the sciences and economics. It’s only natural.

One thing that seems to have stayed stagnant is the minds of the Muslims particularly in Malaysia. It’s like the society has just stayed in a vacuum time capsule.

Fundamentalism in Islam is actually a good thing because it’s suppose to mean that the religion and its teachings hasn’t been corrupted or negatively influenced.

But fundamentalism which means not moving forward, not progressing in terms of thoughts and interpretations, and not wanting to evolve with humankind, now that is dangerous. [Click to read the full article at English.AstroAwani.Com]

No one defended Ridhuan Tee, boohoo!


Dear Assoc. Prof. Dr Mohd Ridhuan Tee Abdullah. What the hell are you talking about?

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No one defended Ridhuan Tee, boohoo!
By Zan Azlee

It has been a very stress free few months for me. The reason is because I have intentionally ignored everything said and written by the nation’s number one nemesis, Ridhuan Tee.

I have ignored his weekly columns and I have ignored all the things that were written about him. Whenever I see his name crop up on my computer screen, I just click away. It’s nice!

That is, right up until a couple of days ago when a friend of mine tagged me in a post on Facebook which had a link to an article about Ridhuan Tee. Ahh… it was good while it lasted!

It was about Ridhuan Tee, in one of his columns, wondering why no one had come to his defence when he was investigated for sedition once before regarding an article he wrote.

It seemed like he was so jealous and envious of the fact that so many Malaysians had come forward in support of Assoc. Prof. Azmi Shahrom when he was charged for sedition recently. [Click to read the full article at The Malaysian Insider]

 

 

Give a man handouts and he gets cash for a day…


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Give a man handouts and he gets cash for a day…
By Zan Azlee

It’s that time of the year again when the nation is gearing up for the tabling of the 2015 national Budget  by prime minister Datuk Seri Najib Razak.

This is when issues about the economy and finances start cropping up taking centre stage in the people’s minds. And of course the number one topic has to be cost of living.

And why wouldn’t it be, right? The rising cost of living in Malaysia affects every person in the country who is, well, living.

Without a doubt, every year, things get more expensive and we have to continue to spend more just to maintain a certain standard or quality of living that is considered decent.

It’s different for different people. Some are happy just being able to survive and put food on the table for themselves and their family while others want a little bit more of an enhanced lifestyle.

How ever you define your standard of living, one thing is constant – as the years go by, you need more and more financially to be able to maintain it, what more to improve.

It is only natural for human beings to expect that to improve your financial situation, you will most probably have to put in more effort.

We are taught that if we put in effort, be it more thought or even more physical work, we will reap the benefits. And for the most parts, this is true.

If we work harder at our jobs, we expect to be recognised and rewarded for it. If we work hard and pursue and education, we also expect there to be a reward for it.

So, I cannot fathom the reasoning of elected leaders who go on and on about how we need to appreciate the fact that the government of the day is so generous in giving handouts.

They go on and on about how cash handouts like the ever increasing BR1M money giveaway and subsidies for petrol, cooking oil, flour, etc, improves people’s lives.

For example, the deputy finance minister Datuk Ahmad Maslan recently said that with all the handouts given, it should cover the living expenses of Malaysians for three months. [Click to read the full article at English.AstroAwani.Com]

Is race-based politics still relevant?


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Is race-based politics still relevant?
By Zan Azlee

I do not agree with race-based politics. There are many examples that actually show how detrimental it is to national harmony in Malaysia.

Recently, I had the opportunity to have a sit-down interview Khairy Jamaluddin, the Minister of Youth and Sports, and he shared with me some of his views.

As we know, he is also the Youth Chief of Umno, a political party that serves to protect the interests of the Malay community in the country.

Khairy says that there is nothing wrong fo r a community to want to protect their interest as long as it doesn’t override the interest of national harmony.

“Politics based on ethnicity that pits one race against another, or the politics of hate and fear, is something that is not on,” he says.

He adds that it is totally fine for groups to protect the rights of different religious communities such as the Muslims, Hindus, Christians, and whatnot.

Khairy is also against extremist voices and hate-speech. He believes that there should be clearer legislation to eliminate this from continuing

In theory, I do agree with what he says. However, my point of contention is that there has been too many incidents that just shows the negative side of race-based politics.

I have the opinion that it is through decades of race-based politics that we see how segregated Malaysia is at the current moment. [Click to read the full article at English.AstroAwani.Com]